What type of native advertising format is best for you?

What type of native advertising format is best for you?

The variety of native ad units makes it difficult to select the right one but the perfect choice can be crucial for the success of your campaign. When it comes to digital, native advertising is the relatively new kid on the block that everyone wants to make friends with!

Here are some useful tips on how to create your native ad strategy

It is useful to combine native advertising with other types of advertising. Typically, native ads are part of a more comprehensive content marketing strategy.

Here is a short guide to creating a marketing strategy that includes native advertising.

1. List your objectives

What goals do you want to achieve with native advertising? Having a clear set of goals is the quickest route to success.

Set up realistic goals by waiting at least 3 months to gather data and set up realistic objectives.

Some goals to focus on:

  • Boost awareness of your brand
  • Increase traffic to your site
  • Generate more sales leads

Budgeting: once you’ve defined your goals, work out how much you can spend to reach them. Create an appropriate budget for your native ads campaign.

Make sure your budget allows for some flexibility to react to online feedback and optimisation as the native ads campaign progresses.

2. Reach your audience

To produce the right content at the right time, ask yourself:

  • Who is my ideal user?
  • Do I know the who, what, where, when and how of my audience?
  • What are my audience’s preferences, interests, demographic characteristics and geographic composition?

3. How do you want to reach your target audience?

This is an essential question to consider when creating a native ad strategy.
Though there is no need to produce the content for the duration of the campaign in advance do set up the timelines and budgets for each native ad campaign and think about which platforms and formats to use for your native ads and each campaign’s theme and goal.

Some great channels where you can publish your content:

  • Youtube for videos and vlogs
  • Medium for blogs
  • Pinterest for pinning blog posts with images
  • iTunes for podcasts
  • Quora for Q&A type of exposure

4. Work on your content ideas

Let’s get into the nitty gritty of your native ad strategy.

It’s time to get creative and start developing ideas for the content each native ad campaign will run.

Find inspiration in what your native ad campaign’s goal is and your knowledge about your target audience. Keep in mind the intended publisher’s guidelines when creating the specific ads and other content pieces.

Does your content fit the following?

  • Platform
  • Format
  • Goals
  • Target audience

Remember: your native advertising content will seamlessly blend in with the rest of the content on an app, website, or publisher.

5. Measure Your Campaign’s Performance

It is useful to know how your native ads are performing in its early stages. Measure the performance during the campaign and optimize it regularly to get the best results.

Data is your most valuable asset.

Gather as much relevant data as you can to monitor and decide what your next steps should be. Don’t be afraid to try out different subject lines, images or videos, and CTAs, then collect performance data to understand what works best.

Choosing the best native ad unit for you

So, which is the best native ad unit for you? It depends! Here are some:

Social

In-feed social media marketing is the most famous form of native advertising. Here sponsored posts target their users in their news feeds or suggested via trending topics.

In-feed

Native advertising on social media is considered “in-feed”, but not all in-feed native advertising takes place on social platforms. Real time bidding allows digital marketers to use targeting techniques and offer relevant ads to people across a list of pre-approved websites. While the ad takes on the look and feel of an article, it is possible to differentiate it from organic content by an advertising label.

Recommended Content

While in-feed ads are generally placed within a publisher’s content feed, recommended content is nearly always located at the bottom of a given publisher site. Just like an in-feed ad, users can click on it and are taken out of the publisher site to the blog or landing page of the brand responsible for the ad.

Test, test, test

…to make sure your ads are targeted at your ideal client types and get in touch for more tips and guidance when it comes to your native ad campaigns.

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