How Can Native Advertising Benefit Both Advertisers and Publishers?

Calling All Publishers! Advertising and publishing can have a mutually beneficial relationship in an ideal environment.

Sign: How Can Native Advertising Benefit Both Advertisers and Publishers?

While advertising can provide a publisher with a consistent revenue source, the publisher’s audience can provide high-quality traffic that allows the advertising message to reach a larger audience.

This is valid if you have a high-quality ad experience. However, in-your-face advertisement that is thrust in the face of the audience can also detract from a publisher’s content experience. People prefer to access the content they enjoy without the ad experience interfering with their content experience, if ad blocker use patterns are any indication.

Native advertising is the ideal option for advertisers who want to incorporate the maximum amount of marketing messages into a content experience without negatively impacting it, benefiting both advertisers and publishers

1-Native blends with the publisher experience

A successful native ad is visually appealing enough to stand out in the stream of content that the viewer is scrolling through, but it is also cleverly crafted to pique the consumer’s interest in the advertiser’s message without being obtrusive.

2- Native ads generate much higher click-through rates than other formats

For publishers, it means that their users can enjoy the material without their commercial interests interfering.

3- Smarter way to market content

A native ad with content that is highly relevant to the publisher’s piece of content will actually increase the likelihood of the viewer clicking on the ad, improving the publisher’s ad revenue opportunities.

4- Greater credibility

Native ads are always labelled clearly as paid or sponsored content, so that audiences understand their exact nature, giving them the choice to interact with the ad. A successful native advertising platform, on the other hand, runs algorithms that only display ads in context to what the user is viewing. This protects the publisher’s reputation, while enabling the advertisers to profit from native ad results: such as higher CTR, greater purchase intent, greater brand recall.

5- Greater control over content

A native ad’s primary characteristic is that it must blend in with its host environment. This means that in order to monetize, publishers do not have to compromise their values. Although this can encourage marketers to use their imaginations to capture user interest, it also leads to stronger storylines and storytelling, which leads to more traction with potential customers.

Native Advertising satisfies the ambitions and needs of both publishers and advertisers without jeopardizing any party’s standards. This not only maintains a balance between their business interests, but also provides an uninterrupted content experience for the end user.

In other words, it’s a win-win situation for digital marketers.

The Evolution of Native Advertising

The term “Native advertising,” an extremely popular term now, is actually fairly recent. It was first coined by Fred Wilson at the Online Media, Marketing, and Advertising Conference in 2011.

Native advertising is used to create content in order to build connections with their potential customers. The fact that the term itself is recent may lead people to assume that native advertising is a modern-day creation. In reality, the history of native advertising dates back to as early as the end of the 1800s, when John Deere published his agricultural journal, “The Furrow”, to promote his products to farmers.

How it all started

In the mid-18th and early 19th century newspaper ads were a one-column piece with very few images. Magazine advertisements were mostly reserved for the back pages of magazines.

Only a handful of companies utilized branded advertising to promote their products until a change occurred in the late-19th century. This change took place when companies began to manufacture standardized products such as soap, canned products, and cigarettes, with the objective of attracting buyers through an advertising campaign that spanned the entire nation.

New advertising styles were born at this time, including native advertising. As mentioned John Deere’s “The Furrow” was the first example with articles on agriculture and farming tips targeted at 17 different regions, the magazine’s, importantly, also included adverts that promoted his agricultural products.

The 20th century

The 20th century, saw native advertising taking on different formats. In the 1920s and 1930s, the rise of radio and TV industry in the 1920s and 1930s contributed strongly to the growth of native advertising.

On radio, companies often provided funding to radio programs to sustain their advertisement spots. “The Eveready Hour” was America’s first sponsored radio program on WEAF Radio in New York. It was first aired in 1923, and was sponsored by the National Carbon Company to promote the company’s Eveready Batteries.

The mass production of televisions meant that more businesses began to advertise their goods to specific audiences. America’s multinational consumer goods company P&G was among the first sponsors of branded TV drama series, hence came the term, “soap operas.”

The 21st century

The Internet, in the 21st century has provided the ideal environment for native advertising. Modern-day native advertising is no longer limited to radio or TV. Search engine companies encourage businesses to promote their services through search ads that connect with target customers.

Social networks like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are also users of native advertising, meeting advertisers’ needs by displaying sponsored posts and tweets throughout their feeds. Starting 2011, Facebook started featuring “Sponsored Stories” in users’ News Feed, streamlining its advertisements into a combined unit with social context.

Similar to Facebook, Twitter interacts with businesses through its “Promoted Tweets” purchased by advertisers seeking to attract a particular audience group’s attention. This year has seen a rise, however, of non-social native advertising. The native growth rate in articles and publications is three times higher than native advertising in social media.

Why Native?

Native ads are visually similar to the publication: they use the same fonts, layouts, and graphic design as the environment that surrounds them. Brands are using it to promote their products in every type of medium, including print, online, video, and social media and they function just like natural content.

What are the advantages of Native Advertising?

In contrast to other, more traditional and invasive advertising formats, like banners or pop-ups which interrupt the internet user’s navigation, native advertising has the ability to attract much more attention from the readers.

This is mainly due to the fact that native advertising uses the format and style of the digital content to promote a certain content or product.
For full details of how native & contextual advertising can benefit your brand head over to www.vertismedia.co.uk

Display ads versus native ads

It can sometimes be difficult to understand the digital marketing jargon so, if you are confused, read on…

Display ads versus native ads

Confusing fact *1: One of the first misconceptions surrounding display advertising is that it is all considered display. Well, it’s not.

Confusing fact *2: Native advertising can sometimes be content marketing and sometimes display ads.

So, what is a display ad?

Display ads are normally located in “boxes” along the top of web pages…Like a traditional banner advert or video. They appear on parts on the site that are committed to paid advertising and aimed at creating a rapid conversion.

These traditional display ads are very different from native ads. These are created to blend in with their surroundings, they are a continuation of the environment that they are placed in, which means: less disruption.

Display ads are very straight forward to track and measure and are widely used for this reason. This is also why they are widely ignored.

Native ads, on the other hand, fit into what the consumer is already experiencing, adding to a step by step progression in terms of user journey that makes sense. I think you would agree with Vertismedia on this one: there is no point displaying an add about cars to a consumer who is looking up a gluten free recipe!